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Boston Bicyclists & Risk of Road Rage

Cyclists are getting more attention from road designers and politicians as bike safety becomes a bigger priority. Unfortunately, not everyone is embracing the increasing bike-friendly culture and not everyone is excited about bicycles increasing in popularity as a means of commuting. Reports of anti-cyclist hate abound, leading to articles titled Why You Hate Cyclists, and 14 Reasons Why We hate Cyclists. no-bicycles-1161065-m.jpg

Unfortunately, drivers venting their rage at bicycle riders is not just a harmless way to let off steam. When drivers become angry at riders or question the right of bicyclists to share the road, these drivers put bicycle riders in danger. Drivers who dislike bicycle riders might fail to yield the right of way, might pass too close to cyclists, might not respect the bike lane and might not look carefully for bicyclists in their path before they open the door.

While these bicycle riders could get help from a Boston bike accident attorney to pursue a claim against a driver who causes a collision, it is always best to avoid accidents in the first place. To do this, drivers need to make the safety of bicycle riders a priority and need to become more accepting of the fact that bikes have a right to share the road with them.

Why Cyclists Enrage Drivers

An article on BBC.com recently presented one possible theory about why drivers dislike bicycle riders. The theory was centered around the fact that driving is a moral activity, with rules of the road to be obeyed and good and bad drivers. Traffic flows only because people follow the rules for the most part, including staying in their lanes, taking turns and yielding as required, and signaling before turning and changing lanes.

Bicycles, on the other hand, are allowed to do things that drivers are not permitted to do like moving past lines of cars, driving below the speed limit or passing on the inside. This can create a situation where bicyclists are viewed by drivers as stepping outside of the accepted social rules.

Of course, bicycle riders are expected to obey the same rules that drivers must obey when they ride their bikes on main roads. They too must yield and must stay in their bicycle lane. Still, drivers may become mad when they see that bikes are doing things that cars can’t.

Whether this theory is true, the fact is that drivers must respect the rights of bicyclists even if they don’t like them. Drivers and bicycle riders both play a role in preventing collisions from occurring, and as the weather gets warmer and there are more riders on the road it will become even more important for everyone on the road to drive carefully and be respectful of others sharing the roadways regardless of what type of vehicle they are in.

If you were involved in a Boston bicycle collision, contact Jeffrey S. Glassman for a free and confidential appointment to discuss your rights. Call 1-888-367-2900.

More Blog Entries:
Auto Insurance Claims in Massachusetts: You are Not in Good Hands, Boston Car Accident Lawyer Blog, March 13, 2014.